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What to Do If Your Employer Does Not Have Workers’ Compensation Insurance
Posted by: Robert Younce on Feb 22, 2017

If you are injured at work, most companies have workers’ compensation insurance to help pay for your medical expenses. Workers’ compensation insurance may also provide disability payments for time you have to take off work (usually around two-thirds of your normal salary). It may also pay additional benefits like retraining and future medical expenses, including rehabilitation.

DOES WORKERS’ COMP COVER A REPETITIVE STRAIN INJURY?
Posted by: Samuel Pond on Feb 15, 2017

Many people associate workers’ compensation with one-time catastrophic work accidents such as a construction worker falling from scaffolding or a carpenter losing a limb. While these types of devastating injuries are most certainly eligible for workers’ compensation, there are other injuries that can take months or even years to develop.  Repetitive strain injury workers’ compensation cases, sometimes called Mancini workers’ compensation cases, are also compensable under the Pennsylvania Workers’ Compensation Act.

WHO PAYS WORKERS COMP BENEFITS WHEN I WORK UNDER THE DIRECTION OF ANOTHER COMPANY ?
Posted by: Douglas Landau on Feb 8, 2017

When an employee of a subcontractor does work for another contractor, the Virginia Workers Compensation Commission may view the arrangement as that of a “borrowed servant” or “loaned employee” and make the supervising company pay comp benefits.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN THAT OWCP SENT ME A LETTER FROM A QUALITY ASSURANCE SPECIALIST ("QAS")?
Posted by: Jeffrey Zeelander on Feb 1, 2017

When OWCP sends you a letter telling you to do something, if there is an explicity threat that if you don't cooperate your benefits will be sanctioned, then you cannot ignore the letter. However, if the letter does not give you notice that there is a penalty for not responding, then you may want to consider whether or not you respond. 

OWCP APPEALS
Posted by: Gregory Hall on Jan 25, 2017

If the Office of Workers Compensation Programs (OWCP) denies a FECA claim, the District Office’s decision should clearly state the reasons why the claim was denied. A common reason for denial is that the evidence submitted by the claimant does not satisfy the claimant’s burden of proof. Often a claim is denied because the medical evidence does not establish that the claimant’s medical condition was caused by a compensable (or work-related) factor. The OWCP requires the claimant to submit a report that provides medical rationale.

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